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Latest From Senior School

TERM 4 -
WEEK 7

Important Dates for Senior School

Thursday 18 to Tuesday 23 November – Year 11 Examination period

Friday 19 November – 2021 Christian College Art Festival online

Sunday 21 November – Year 12 Graduation Ceremony

Tuesday 23 November – Senior School Presentation Afternoon filming

Wednesday 24 to Friday 26 November – Student-free days

Monday 29 November to Friday 3 December – Senior School Transition Week

Year 10 Outdoor Ed – Murray River Trip

As you canoe down the Murray, you notice the current drifting you effortlessly. You enjoy the smooth paddle as you kick your legs up and laugh with your friends. Spot the different species of wildlife as you glance around you. Hear the songs of the birds as you raft up and spend some time in silence, witnessing the tranquility. Feel the cool water as you swim across to touch New South Wales. Experience the connection you feel to the environment when you notice its beauty, prompting you to protect it. Notice the Scar Trees made by Indigenous people to create canoes. I wonder what the story of the Murray is? I wonder who has set foot here before us?

The Year 10 Outdoor Ed students had the wonderful opportunity to see, feel and hear what the beautiful Murray environment has to offer. And of course, smell and taste their ‘delicious’ trangia cooked meals made on the riverbanks as the sun was setting.

Each one of the students had a challenge they had to persevere through. Whether that was braving the cold camping experience at night, the different ways to pack food and items into a hiking pack, or remembering how to keep a canoe straight! Not to mention cooking on a not so familiar contraption. They developed and demonstrated resilience and a growth mindset attitude while facing and overcoming their personal challenges.

The students were able to take what they have been learning in the classroom and make connections to their experience in the great outdoors. This could be understanding the species that live within the environment, the people connected to the Murray and the issues that impact them, or the more personal connection to environment and understanding of self. Spending time in the outdoors created a deeper love for the environment. Students began to realise the importance of not leaving any mark behind them, by taking all rubbish and food scraps home.

It was great to see students getting to know each other outside of a classroom setting, learning how to manage social situations for a long period of time, and just enjoy being in each other’s presence… All without any distractions of phones.

Enjoy some student reflections below:

“A highlight looking back for me was the feeling of forgetting everything but where we were and what we were doing at the present. I felt present enjoying everything around me and the views we saw each day.”

Nicola Rivo-George

“I feel we often visit places without taking the time to connect with the environment. This was the first time I visited the Murray and took the time to appreciate the things right before my eyes, it was really rewarding to experience, and I would go back in a heartbeat.”

Isabella Jordan

  • Deakin Accelerate Student Results 2021

    Congratulations to the five Year 12 students who this year extended their learning by embarking on extra study through the Deakin Accelerate program.

    Ayden Cronkwright, Lani Cavanagh, Jack Frencham, Thomas Hegyesi and Charlotte  Meehan all received either a Distinction (70+) or High Distinction (80+) as their final grade. Well done on a great effort.

    To all Year 11s, if you are interested in adding to your studies next year, please feel free to contact me d.fanning@ccg.vic.edu.au

    More information on Deakin Accelerate can be found here

    https://www.deakin.edu.au/student-life-and-services/support-for-high-school-students/deakin-accelerate-program

  • Year 10 Our World Gunnai

    As society embarks on the journey of acknowledging the deep truth and history of its First Peoples, the Year 10 Our world students began their own search for answers by spending time on Gunnai country. There, they tried to piece together the jigsaw puzzle that once was the first Sovereign nations of the Australian continent and its adjacent lands. This puzzle consists of over 500 language groups, each with their own Lore, Customs, Kinship, Land, Ceremony, and thousands of years of culture. When all the pieces of the puzzle are joined together, it reveals the most iconic image of this beautiful place that we are lucky enough to call home, Australia.

    This enriching program has allowed students to imagine what was here before Europeans arrived and changed everything; to visit cultural sites around the Mitchell River, Lake Tyers and Metung area and to speak to custodians of Gunnai on their country and create inner reflection. The program provided powerful learning experiences that complement so many parts of the curriculum the students have been studying in class since the start of the term. Below are some reflections from these students:

    Nrung-a Nargune:

    The Den of Nargun for me was one of the highlights of the program as it was an extremely special place that I had the privilege to witness. We were able to watch in silence for a while, just sitting there, being in this sacred place, I remember these two birds circling around the cave. Disappearing under the cave ledge just for a few seconds, it would feel like they disappeared for good, but soon enough they would fly back out once again. As this site is considered a special and sacred place for women and women’s business, I felt a special connection to what this place signifies. We were able to learn and discover more about this site as we were walking along the Mitchell River Trail. Stories were told about how if the original custodians of the land were to walk near the Den of Nargun, they would be pulled into the cave never to be seen again.

    Molly Cooper

    Custodians of Gunnai Country:

    Personally, meeting Wayne Thorpe and his son David Thorpe was a unique, once in a lifetime opportunity for me and my peers. When we met them next to the beach at Lake Tyers, he seemed incredibly eager to have a chat to us about anything that came to his mind about Gunnai culture, traditions, ceremony, and anything of importance for us to have an understanding of. He had a great sense of humour, bright personality, and really connected to us as young people and students.

    As we moved to different spots around the coast, he moved into different topics based on our location and our growing understanding. We started looking out into the beach, then up onto the hill to look at onto the landscape. This is where he explained to us the importance and origins of personal totems, the five tribes of the Gunnai, greeting/welcoming onto other tribes’ country, and spirit in all plants, animals, and everything that lives. We finished out on a boardwalk next to a dock, where we learnt about Legend Rock, a story about greed, selfishness and self-absorbance. We listened attentively to this part of our nation’s history that we had not been exposed to before, we barely realised that four hours went by having conversations with Wayne.

    This eye-opening experience made me realise that before choosing this Our World class, the education system has really failed us in teaching us about Traditional Custodians. I now understand that speaking to community leaders like Wayne and David was the most authentic resource you can learn from, and one that the majority don’t have access to. Having an understanding is such a challenge when you don’t know what you don’t know, and we may not know all the answers. Just as long as we continue to ask ourselves questions, moving forward into the future.

    Kalian White and William Burr

    The Hard truth:

    During the Our World program away in East Gippsland on Gunnai country we were able to learn about the hardships faced by Gunnai people. European colonisation resulted in mass murders, missions and the Half-Caste Act. The Ramahyuck cemetery held only three marked graves but many more lay there unmarked. To have such an isolated place (that is now used for farmland) that was barely on the map that holds such great importance was quite confronting to see. We personally thought whilst standing there, what if myself, my friends and family perished for doing absolutely nothing wrong? The Gunnai people were slaughtered with no motive other than the colour of their skin, then left with not even a gravestone. Left unknown and forgotten. We had the privilege of recognising them and being able to see and understand firsthand the importance of the traumatic events of history and appreciate the Gunnai people past and present.

    Amelia Cunningham, Issy Benson and Sophie Benson  

    Where to next: moving forward as a nation?

    Taking and absorbing the information and detailed culture we were exposed to on the Our World program is our first step in moving forward, however, true growth comes from the application of these learnings. The sentimental culture spots around Gippsland such as Lake Tyers, is something that needs to be acknowledged and respected more as the First Peoples lives revolved around these beautiful and most importantly, sacred sites. Sharing all that we’ve learned is one small thing that can spark a chain reaction in little changes towards respect, acknowledgement, and justice.

    Angelica Lawrence and Isabella Henry

    We would like to thank Wayne Thorpe and his son David Thorpe custodians of Gunnai country for inviting us on country and sharing their culture to help us understand and grow in knowledge.

    Christian College Senior Singers Perform on ‘Radio Aid for Refugees’ This Sunday 1 – 4pm… Tune into 94.7 The Pulse FM!

    St Paul’s Anglican Church Geelong and The Combined Refugee Action Group Geelong were to hold a live Concert in October to raise finds in support of refugees. As this event was not able to go ahead, the church has teamed up with 94.7 The Pulse to run a pre-recorded Radio Concert this Sunday from 1 – 4pm. The Christian College Senior Choir and VCE Vocal Student Arielle Renton-Gibb of Year 11 will feature in this program, and we are proud to support this event. Please see the information poster attached with details for donating to this cause. As well please also see the detailed program which is bursting with music from church and community groups from around Geelong.

    We are expecting the Senior Choir’s performance of Adiemus (conducted by Kate Notini) to be played just before 2.00pm and Arielle’s rendition of ‘Eye on the Sparrow’ (accompanied by Kym Dillon)  just before 3.00pm, this Sunday.

    St Paul’s Anglican Church has asked us to promote the concert and cause within our community, the musical program looks wonderful and promises  to be a most enjoyable afternoon of listening. Please share this event with your family and friends.

    Program for Radio Jam:
    View Download

    Year 10 Outdoor Ed – Murray River Trip

    “The Journey along the Murray.” 

    As you canoe down the Murray, you notice the current drifting you effortlessly. You enjoy the smooth paddle as you kick your legs up and laugh with your friends. Spot the different species of wildlife as you glance around you. Hear the songs of the birds as you raft up and spend some time in silence, witnessing the tranquility. Feel the cool water as you swim across to touch New South Wales. Experience the connection you feel to the environment when you notice its beauty, prompting you to protect it. Notice the Scar Trees made by Indigenous people to create canoes. I wonder what the story of the Murray is? I wonder who has set foot here before us?

    The Year 10 Outdoor Ed students had the wonderful opportunity to see, feel and hear what the beautiful Murray environment has to offer. And of course, smell and taste their ‘delicious’ trangia cooked meal made on the riverbanks as the sun was setting.

    Each one of the students had a challenge they had to persevere through. Whether that was braving the cold camping experience at night, the different ways to pack food and items into a hiking pack, or remembering how to keep a canoe straight! Not to mention cooking on a not so familiar contraption. They developed and demonstrated resilience and a growth mindset attitude while facing and overcoming their personal challenges.

    The students were able to take what they have been learning in the classroom and make connections to their experience in the Great Outdoors. This could be understanding the species that live within the environment, the people connected to the Murray and the issues that impact them, or the more personal connection to environment and understanding of self. Spending time in the outdoors created a deeper love for the environment. Students began to realise the importance of not leaving any mark behind them, by taking all rubbish and food scraps home.

    It was great to see students getting to know each other outside of a classroom setting, learning how to manage social situations for a long period of time, and just enjoy being in each other’s presence… All without any distractions of phones.

    Enjoy some student reflections below:  

    “A highlight looking back for me was the feeling of forgetting everything but where we were and what we were doing at the present. I felt present enjoying everything around me and the views we saw each day.”

    Nicola Rivo-George 

    “I feel we often visit places without taking the time to connect with the environment. This was the first time I visited the Murray and took the time to appreciate the things right before my eyes, it was really rewarding to experience, and I would go back in a heartbeat.”

    Isabella Jordan

    Year 10 VET Students – Giving back

    Over the past few weeks, our Year 10 VET students have been working on a project to raise money for a charity of their choice. The students were required to design and create a product that they could sell in the lead-up to Christmas. The students produced a variety of imaginative and interesting items within the usual constraints of time, equipment and materials.

    For sale are decorative Celtic crosses, mirror acrylic snowflakes, dog tags, mini Jenga sets, beaded bracelets, and standing decorative Christmas trees (see photo below). Profits will go to the following charities as nominated by the students, Barwon Health Foundation, Autism Awareness Australia, GAWS, RSPCA, and the Salvation Army. Prices range from $2 to $10 with discounts for bulk orders available.

    If you would like to support the above charities by purchasing any of these products, they are available in the Senior School staff room or by contacting VET 10 teachers, Ivan Ludinic or Andy Seiffert or by phoning the Senior School on 5241 1577.

    Careers Spot

    Just for your Interest

    Did you know that today is National Agricultural Day – a time to consider the fabulous and fulfilling career opportunities in agriculture – from mustering cattle in the Top End to developing the next breakthrough wheat variety. This National Agriculture Day, celebrate the everyday extraordinary efforts of our farmers and all that is good about Australian agriculture.  Please find attached a document explaining this further.

    Career Newsletters

    You will find attached two career newsletters. We hope you will enjoy reading these important documents. Don’t forget to look in the parent portal in SEQTA Engage for our CAREERS section. There is a lot of important information sitting there for students and parents.

    Topics this week include:

    • Year 9 and 10 students: university early admission programs
    • Year 9 and 10 students: Santos Science Experience
    • Year 11 students: National Youth Science Forum – applications closing soon
    • Three amazing sports programs
    • Competitions – photography, art, writing
    • TAFE – free and low cost courses
    • Articles on fashion and psychology
    • The University of Melbourne – Fine Arts and Music
    • University rankings
    • Australian Jobs 2021
    • Tourism and travel course at the Whitsunday Islands
    • Upcoming career events
    Calendar of Events :
    View Download
    Weekly Careers Newsletter:
    View Download
    National Agricultural Day:
    View Download

    Christian College Geelong Senior Ensembles Showcase 2021

    Christian College Geelong Senior Ensembles Showcase 2021

    Featuring students Years 7 – 12 from Bellarine, Highton & Senior Campus’

    Regularly in October the College Community would gather in Costa Hall for the Annual Combined Campus Music Evening featuring hundreds of students from years Prep to 12, sharing their music in a huge annual celebration.

    During the interruptions of the pandemic our College Ensemble program has continued to provide opportunities for students to engage in group music making and creative expression from years Prep to 12.

    The College’s Senior Ensembles feature in this recorded Concert. The Senior Choir, Strings, Stage Band and Wind Symphony will each perform a selection of their 2021 repertoire……. these groups have had extended periods of not being able to rehearse or perform and are so excited to have the opportunity to share their music with family, friends, and community through this presentation.

    Here we also acknowledge the graduating Year 12 musicians. Many of them have been involved in the music program since Junior School but others have joined us later in their school journey. Please see program details below. The Music Faculty staff congratulates the student musicians for their work and proudly presents this ‘Showcase’ to the College Community.

    Fiona Gardner

    Director of Music – Teaching and Learning on Behalf of the Music Faculty Staff

    Update on the new Christian College Wardrobe

    The uniform review team have been grateful for the email responses, questions and suggestions received in response to the launch of the new College wardrobe. The feedback has been overwhelmingly positive and we have also been able to address a number of parent requests, based on the feedback received.

    As a result of the responses and feedback from students and staff, the College Executive and leadership have confirmed that students will be permitted to select items from the full range of the new wardrobe on a daily basis, as well as for formal occasions, such as School Photos and Celebration Evenings etc.

    The College blazer will be still be required for all students in Years 5-12 as the outer garment, and students from Prep-Year 4 will be required to wear their choice of knitwear (jumper, cardigan or vest). The anorak can be worn as the outer garment for Junior School students, along with the item of knitwear.

    The details of the updates have been added to the FAQs on the ‘Our new mix and match wardrobe’ page on our College website, along with some updated story-boards. You can access the updates here.

    We are pleased that some garments have arrived in the uniform shop and others are well into production. A delay in the manufacturing of the dresses has been addressed by the manufacturer by sourcing a Geelong based company to produce these items. We now remain hopeful that we will have a full range available in January, as previously expected.

    A MYTERN Thought for the Week

    If you find yourself alone on the road, it doesn’t mean you are going in the “wrong” direction, or that you have made the “wrong” decision.It just means that you are expanding YOUR map and not just settling for the roads of others.This is your unique journey, so embrace it 👍😊

    www.mytern.com.au